Manufacturing Drug Defense Lawyer

"Manufacturing of controlled substance allegations need aggressive defense."

"Do you think that you might need a skilled criminal defense attorney? Call us."

What is the difference between possession of a drug, and manufacturing?

Possession of a controlled substance or drug basically refers to having custody or control of an illegal narcotic, while manufacturing of a controlled substance means that you have processed a controlled substance, possibly including the packing, re-packing, or labeling of a controlled substance.

The definitions of manufacturing a controlled substance can be utilized by a prosecutor for more than just the chemical mixing of illegal ingredients without being properly registered with the Drug Enforcement Agency. Drug manufacturing includes the natural extraction of essential oils or salts as much as the chemical synthesis. These processes often involve many people and not just a single individual. Often in these cases someone who was involved but was not physically manufacturing the drugs will be charged with conspiracy.

Contact the Law Firm of Matthew Pillado now for a Fast Consultation

800-672-3911

What should you do if charged with Drug Manufacturing?

Manufacturing of a controlled substance is an extremely serious charge. These allegations can have horrific consequences on not only the person who was alleged to be manufacturing  the narcotic, but also their family, friends, and future. Having a skilled criminal defense lawyer who will fight aggressively for your rights is essential to your future.

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7 + 6 =

HEALTH AND SAFETY CODE

 TITLE 6. FOOD, DRUGS, ALCOHOL, AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES

 SUBTITLE C. SUBSTANCE ABUSE REGULATION AND CRIMES

 CHAPTER 481. TEXAS CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES ACT

 SUBCHAPTER A. GENERAL PROVISIONS

 (25) “Manufacture” means the production, preparation, propagation, compounding, conversion, or processing of a controlled substance other than marihuana, directly or indirectly by extraction from substances of natural origin, independently by means of chemical synthesis, or by a combination of extraction and chemical synthesis, and includes the packaging or repackaging of the substance or labeling or relabeling of its container.  However, the term does not include the preparation, compounding, packaging, or labeling of a controlled substance:

(A)  by a practitioner as an incident to the practitioner’s administering or dispensing a controlled substance in the course of professional practice; or

(B)  by a practitioner, or by an authorized agent under the supervision of the practitioner, for or as an incident to research, teaching, or chemical analysis and not for delivery.

The full extent of the Texas Controlled Substances Act.

Contact the Law Firm of Matthew Pillado now for a FREE Consultation

800-672-3911

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